Teaser Tuesday, 23 February – Under the Dome

It’s that time of week again for Should Be Reading’s fun meme Teaser Tuesdays.

So how does this work:

  • Grab your current book
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

I am teasing you again this week with Under the Dome by Stephen King, but this week with three sentences.

She tried calling her sister in Lewiston. The numbers peeped … then nothing. Blank silence, as before.” Pg. 127

QUESTION OF THE DAY
What’s your tease for this Tuesday?

What Are You Reading Monday, 22 February

Thanks to One Persons Journey Through a World of Books for hosting this weekly meme.

Happy Monday! If not for some reading this morning, I would not have any books in the completed column to post about today, but I did finish up The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan a little earlier today. But this month is still shaping up to be a slow, low count month.

I did want to note a special Thank You to Cheryl over at C Mash Loves to Read Books for including this blog in her Thursday meme Thursday Treasure, where she lists a few blogs that are new to her. Thanks Again!!

How about you? What will you be reading this week?

BOOK I COMPLETED
1. The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

BOOKS TO READ
1. Under the Dome by Stephen King
2. The Triumph of Deborah by Eva Etzioni-Halevy (book sent by author)

Review: The Postmistress by Sarah Blake

From Europe in the 1940s during World War II to life in a quiet New England sea town, both are explored and intertwined in Sarah Blake’s new novel The Postmistress, which I read last year as part of Barnes and Noble First Look program.

It is hard to summarize this book without giving too much away since some of the characters become connected later in the book. So instead, I will say that there are two central women in this story that I won’t soon forget.

First is Frankie Bard, a US-correspondent reporting on the war in England. She shares everyday stories of life in wartime with her listeners back in the States. As much as her reporting affects those listening, she too is affected by the war, the stories she hears and the sights she sees.

Second is Iris James, the Postmistress of Franklin, MA. We see her in her job, and we see her as she falls in love late in life. Being the Postmistress of this small community winds-up connecting her with someone in town, more personally than she would have expected.

Both of these women were such strong, well-developed characters that I could have read a book focusing on each one separately. There are of course other characters living in Franklin whose stories are told, notably Emma Trask, the new wife of the town doctor who finds herself alone when she needs her husband the most and Henry Vale, who takes a liking to Iris and takes on the role of protecting Franklin from German U-boats.

While I wasn’t totally happy with the ending, because of Blake’s writing and storytelling and her strong characters, I left this book overall enjoying it.

I received this book for review from the Barnes and Noble First Look program.

Teaser Tuesday, 16 February – Under the Dome

It’s that time of week again for Should Be Reading’s fun meme Teaser Tuesdays.

So how does this work:

  • Grab your current book
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This week I am teasing you with Under the Dome by Stephen King.

They pushed on, Gendron on his side and Barbie on his. As yet, neither of them were thinking in terms of inside and outside.” Pg. 59

What is your teaser this week?

What Are You Reading Monday, 15 February

Thanks to One Persons Journey Through a World of Books for hosting this weekly meme.

It’s the middle of February, and my reading is a bit slow this month. Again, only finished up one book last week, but I did get my first chunkster started for the Chunkster Reading Challenge.

How about you? What will you be reading this week?

BOOK I COMPLETED
1. Dead as a Doornail by Charlaine Harris

BOOKS TO READ
2. The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan
3. Under the Dome by Stephen King

Review: Across the Endless River by Thad Carhart

In 1805 while making her cross-country journey with Lewis and Clark, Sacagawea gave birth to her son with Toussaint Charbonneau, Baptiste, known affectionately by his family as Pompy. Baptiste made the journey with the group across the country all the way to California, the first of his long travels and adventures.

This is the beginning of Thad Carhart’s historical fiction novel Across the Endless River.

Being of two different cultures, Baptiste moves between the two easily, but never feels fully embraced by either. When he is of school-age, rather than stay with his mother’s tribe, he is sent to St. Louis to attend school, returning to the tribe during the summer months, learning the language and ways of the tribe.

Once he is older and working with the fur traders on the Missouri River, a chance encounter with Duke Paul of Wurttemberg, who is in the U.S. to learn about the tribes, animals and plant-life, changes the course of Baptiste’s life. While Baptiste is leading Duke Paul on the river, the Duke sees the potential of Baptiste given his knowledge of many languages and the Native American culture, and asks Baptiste to accompany him back to Europe and help him catalog his artifacts and explain Native American culture and history as Duke Paul writes his book on the frontier.

Baptiste accepts his offer, and the reader is taken through Europe in the 1820s and beyond, through Baptiste’s eyes as he crossed the Endless River (the Atlantic) and experiences, among many things, life in upper class and aristocratic Europe. Being a young man, Baptiste does not spend all his time exploring his environs and working with Duke Paul – he meets a young woman when he arrives in France, Maura, with a colorful life of her own; and also spend much time with the Duke’s cousin Theresa, who is older than Baptiste and helps to teach him about the world in which he has come to live.

While turning the pages of this book, I felt that I was there on the Missouri, sailing across the Atlantic, walking through the streets of Paris. Carhart’s writing is very descriptive, sometimes almost too much. But even when the descriptions got a little long for me, it never diminished my enjoyment of this story or its characters.

I received this book for review from FSB Associates.

Teaser Tuesday, 9 February – Dead as a Doornail

It’s that time of week again for Should Be Reading’s fun meme Teaser Tuesdays.

So how does this work:

  • Grab your current book
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

I am teasing you again this week with Ms. Sookie and Dead as a Doornail by Charlaine Harris. But this week, I am teasing you with three sentences.

Sam grinned, which knocked about ten years off his age. He looked over my shoulder as we heard the sound of gravel crunching under yet another vehicle. ‘Look who’s coming,’ he said.” Pg. 132

QUESTION OF THE DAY
What’s your tease for this Tuesday?